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Ohio, United States
Happily married for lots of years to great guy, mother of one wonderful daughter. I have lots of interests and wished I had more time to explore them all.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Wrist Warmers, Fingerless Gloves

Modeling with one hand and photographing with the other hand, sorry folks, that makes for not the best picture.  These are wrist warmers, recently designed by our good friend, and long time supporter, RoseMarie.  She has made them in past using double crochets and I asked if she (she's sooooooooo creative), could mess with the pattern and come up with one using sc?  And here you have the results.  I thought the single crochets would make them a bit more sturdy and warmer.  

Mittens is something we've never gotten enough of, in terms of our donations.  And while wrist warmers obviously aren't as warm as full mittens, I thought it might help us bridge the gap.  Mittens aren't the easiest to knit or crochet and not something many of us have the ability to do.  However, I think this is something many of us can do.  


Turning my hand over so you all can see the other side.  

Here's the pattern:
Chain 24 and join to form circle, being careful to not twist your chain.
Add marker so you can tell where the end of the row is, adds in counting rows.
Row 1: sc (single crochet) across to the end of row, do not increase, do not add extra sc when you would normally add when to go to the next row.  Stitch count remains 24.
Row 2: Repeat row 1 until 27 rows are complete.  Stitch count is still 24, no increases done.
Row 28: Form the thumb opening
sc across 20 stitches (4 stitches remain), chain 4 and join this chain to the end of the row.  Your chain 4 and the 4 remaining stitches are equal, and your stitch count is still 24.  No increases or decreases made.
Row 29: sc across row (stitch count 24) You will sc into the 4 chain stitches at your rows end
Row 30: repeat row 8 more times (a total of 9 rows from forming your thumb opening).
After completing row 37, bind off.
Using a darning needle work your tail in.

RoseMarie used an I hook in this example.  It very nicely fits me.  I'm a small woman.

Using a larger hook would make the wrist warmers larger, using a smaller hook would make them smaller.  Would think we could play with adding a few stitches if we want to fit a man.  Using too large a hook might make them less warm, as they would be more open??

Thank you RoseMarie for your dedication.  You are a AWESOME.

Yarn used, regular worsted weight.


All donations regardless of size and number are valued. All donations are appreciated. The Power of One is awesome, and when we work together The Power of One becomes The Power of Many.

10 comments:

  1. marj in minnnesotaOctober 9, 2014 at 12:40 PM

    GOOD JOB, ROSEMARIE. Look nice and warm and I am sure someone will be happy to receive these. Have seen people wear these over another pair of light weight gloves for extra warmth as well.Amazingly the fingerless thing is not as much of an issue as one would think. If your hands and wrists are warm your fingers are too.Also good if you need to do things with your hands while wearing warmers. Fingers and thumbs out makes it easy to do any number of things with warm hands. Again good job.

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  2. Wearing these with light weight gloves underneath, would indeed be a double warmth thing. Thanks Marjorie for your wonderful comments.

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  3. Marj, thank you for the nice comment on the hand warmer.Marj I mail my packages thru the post office. maybe it would cost less thru them. thanks marj. rosemarie.

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  4. Marj thank you for the nice comment on the hand warmer, I mail my packages thru the post office, maybe it would cost less thru them. thanks marj. rosemarie

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  5. These are Lovely! So nice and convenient for those who need fingers free.
    In the pattern, when you say "do not add extra sc when you would normally add when to go to the next row" are you saying to work in a spiral? Or just not to increase? I would normally join with a slip stitch to first sc, then chain and sc in the first stitch to begin the next row, keeping the same number of stitches around.

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  6. marj in minnesota/ 52 degreesOctober 9, 2014 at 5:06 PM

    You asked my question Sandie. I was wondering the same thing. Two minds with a single thought:+)
    I have not tried the PO for my shipping RoseMarie. My sister uses them for her donations. I think I will check on it with my next shipment. Thanks for the idea, and the pattern..

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  7. sandie, the pattern is worked in a spiral, no ch1. just crochet around until you get to the thumb .keep track of the rows with a marker.work as many rows above the thumb as needed to the knuckles.thank you. Rosemarie.

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  8. Work into the stitch so you don't increase, a slip stitch would work fine, just wanted to clarify you're not adding stitches. Thanks

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  9. Thanks, Rosemarie and Sandy! That clarifies it nicely.

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  10. Very nice fingerless glove! Nice of you Rosemarie to share the pattern. They look warm.

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