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Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Knitting Looms

A-Z Challenge =L= Loom
These are plastic colorful looms in 4 sizes with the special hook one needs along with a darning needle.  This is what you typically get in a kit.  The kits are inexpensive and easy to use.  They produce knitting and have become very popular.  They're a good way to knit, if you don't know how to knit, as well as just something different to do.  When they first became popular they were primarily used to knit hats.  Some looms are plastic, some are wood and some are super flexible.
The size is consistent regardless of what brand you buy.  The knitting gauge is based on the space between the pegs.  Some folks even make their own looms.  Now looms come in ovals, rectangles, and stripes in addition to these basic circles.  People have tweaked patterns and you can make scarves, mittens and more on them.  We have those who donate to Bridge and Beyond for the Homeless using these types of looms.  They are generally used with double yarn, or bulky yarn and many feel the knitting goes faster on looms then hand knitting with needles.  I confess, that while I have a set of looms (have for years), I've not really used them.  Perhaps someday I'll give them a try.

When we were kids, we used looms...looms made from wooden spools of empty thread.  Yes!  I am that old that I remember wooden spools of thread, in fact I still have a few, lol  You could pound small nails evenly around a large wooden spool and for a hook.........we used a diaper pin.  See told you I was old....diaper pins, mothers today don't even have any on hand.  All we could make back then was a cord, but we did it for hours at a time.

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28 comments:

  1. Your wooden spool with nails on with which you made a thick cord that came out the bottom was called, I believe, "corking". I had one as a kid. You made miles of cord and then got your mom to coil it and sew it together for a dresser mat or a small rug.

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    1. Right you are, had forgotten about Mom sewing them in the round, think I used it with my dolls, lol

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  2. I had one of the original spool looms also. Dont remember much about it but I do remember one of my aunts teaching me how. She was a kindergarten teacher and used me as a test student in many of her school projects..:+)As to these newer plastic looms I would have to say that if you have arthritic wrists like I do they are not a good idea. Very painful time spent last year trying to learn to use them and realizing that my wrists are no longer strong enough to manage it. Made a doll hat and quit.Have several friends who like me gave it a try and never mentioned it again:+)Wound up making up a donation of the looms and yarn and sending them off to a Special Ed class, here in the city. Hope they enjoyed them more then I did .GOD BLESS THE HOMELESS..marj in minnesota

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    1. I've only tried it once myself, and found it hard on the hands, but I think some folks do well with them.

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  3. I remember those spool looms also. I bought a set of the plastic looms for my granddaughter. I thought it would be easier for her than knitting with needles. Actually it was. She picked up the routine quicker than I did. We both lost interest pretty quickly though. I’ll stick to my needles and hooks.

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    1. Like you, I prefer my hooks and needles, but some folks make all kinds of things from the looms. I've even seen directions for mittens using them.

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  4. I had these looms also. I thought it would be a good and different way to make hats other than knitting needles and crochet hooks. I did not like the end result. The hat was really loose. I put it down never to be picked up again. Not even sure what happened to them. I'll stick with knitting and crocheting thank you. :)

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    1. I think the folks who use double yarn to make the loom hats do well, I tried it once with single yarn and it was not to my liking either Bunny. Too flemsy, so I pulled it out.

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  5. another interesting post. Doubt I will ever make a loom though

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    1. Don't think many folks make them now, you can't get wooden spools like we used back in the dark ages, lol.

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    1. Maybe we can spur you forward to use your looms again and donate something for Bridge and Beyond.

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  7. Aww, I have a nice flashback to my childhood about wooden spools with little nail in them. They were a lot of fun. I used to knit, crochet, needlepoint and weave a lot in my young adulthood. I've gotten away from all that now. Life ... you know. Thanks for the post. Have fun with the A-Z Challenge!

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    1. Thanks for the visit, Jeanne...pull out your yarn and needles again, we'ld love to have you join us.

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    2. Jeanne, I tried to revisit your blog, but you don't seem to have comments enabled.

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  8. I do remember the wooden spools, but never made anything with them. I do use a loom to make hats. I hate knitting hats. I find that using bulky yarn works better than a light weight yarn.

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    1. Thanks Sue, using the bulky yarn ...does that work the same as using double WW yarn?

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    2. I tried the double yarn, but like the bulky so much better. With the double you have to make sure you pick up the two yarns to put it over the new two yarns on the peg.

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  9. I saw a loom similar to this at Walmart that I think said you could knit a scarf. I was wondering if it actually worked, but now I'm thinking it might work. Will have to check it out after the challenge; could be a quick easy way to make scarves!

    betty

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    1. Hope you do Betty, people can be quite successful using those looms to make a variety of things.

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  10. I only know the old fashioned looms I had no idea they come in plastic like what you show. I still have old baby pins that my mom kept

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    1. Birgit, you could use the safety pins instead of the hook they package with the looms, I know some folks use a crochet hook also.

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  11. I had know idea what a loom was. Thankyou for sharing :)

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    1. They have them now in every size and shape you can think of.

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  12. Hmm maybe a loom is the key to me learning how to knit!

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    1. Sing out Brandy if you give it a go. SSeger above looms quite successful and could probaly answer some questions for you.

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    2. I am willing to help. Are you on Ravelry? You can PM me there. I am SSeger there also. Good luck with the loom!

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  13. I remember in first grade having a square loom-looking thing, and we made potholders for our moms for Christmas. For folks who can't knit but would like to, this looks like an easier way to do it.

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